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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 849 (some duplicates have been removed)
of egypt, the mightiest empire of the ancient world. he was a god. nothing was beyond his means. when tutankhamun sat upon his throne, thousands of years of history and achievement had already preceded him. surely a nation that could bring itself into being and create wonders like the great pyramids could overcome man's final enemy--death. and overcome death tutankhamun has--at least according to the ancient egyptian funerary beliefs, for the very act of speaking his name provides magic to infuse tutankhamun with everlasting life. names were important to the egyptians. a name symbolized one's personality and even one's very existence. to remember the dead was to make them live again. and so tutankhamun must, for the whole world has known his name ever since that day in november of 1922, when archeologist howard carter and his patron, lord carnarvon, tued a forgotten pharaoh into a legend. the story of tutankhamun's treasures begins here in the secret valley of the kings in egypt, across the river from the ancient capital of thebes. the valley of the kings is hot and very dry. in the s
>> george: today on christian world news, egypt's second revolution. mass riots and violence break out against the new president. we have an exclusive interview with the new leader of egypt's 8 million coptic christians. >> wendy: plus, pastor in prison. iran sentenced saeed abedini to eight years for starting house churches. his family calls on the world to act and to pray. >> george: and a small band of christians shares the gospel in one of the most dangerous places in the world. is a second revolution shaking egypt? hello, everyone, i'm george thomas. >> wendy: and i'm wendy griffith. riots shook egypt on the second anniversary of the revolution that drove hosni mubarak from power. more than 60 people died in conflicts between police and rock-throwing protestors. in cairo, police fired tear gas into the largest church in the middle east, where a field doctor was treating victims. they are also protesting the new constitution that they say does not adequately protect women or religious minorities. opposition partrts are calling for a new national unity government and amendments
the senate and the house particularly with pat's support. >> i agree the edge. -- egypt on the edge. (speaking a foreign language). >> state of emergency. that's what egypt's president morsi announced this week. plus a curfew to curtail violent protests that have been raised in several egyptian cities. 54 people have died. another warning came from the country's army chief, that's egypt's -- that's egypt's political problems are pushing the near anarchy along the sues canal. in cairo a mob ransacked the fire star intercontinental hotel. it has been two years since mubarak was september from power. the new -- was swept from power. the new present morsi is an islamist aligned with the brotherhood. adding to the unrest is egypt's weak economy. egypt's credit rating was downgraded from a b plus to a b. it cited instability. the urgency of egypt's climate brought leaders of all political stripes in a rare meeting tuesday. included were the muslim brotherhood. the shroff if is and secular and bib brail faxes, including mohammed el bar day and his national front. the group issued a stateme
londoners are changing their minds about germans. we first turn to the struggle for democracy in egypt. again, supporters of the opposition are being killed exactly two years after the bloody revolution that toppled dictator hosni mubarak. at the time, egyptia enthusiastically ushered in a new era, but the new president has since left many people deeply disappointed. some egyptians are downright worried beethat under the muslim brotherhood, the country has moved even further from democracy. one blogger is one of those who openly criticizes the new government, but he had to leave egypt to be able to do so. >> the market square is a popular tourist destination. usually, it is filled with people strolling through, taking pictures of st. mary's church, but not everyone carrying a camera here today is on holiday. kareem is not a taurus. he is a 28-will blog your -- 28- year-old logger -- blogger from egypt. the city offered him refuge for one year. the idea was to give him some breathing room and time to feel safe again. his first impressions involved pigeons like these. >> it is not like t
is speaking right now. meanwhile in egypt, the president has urged syrian opposition groups to unify. the call came as he addressed leaders of islamists states at a summit in cairo is also focusing on the battle against militants in mali. >> among the leaders gathered is mahmoud ahmadinejad, making his first trip to egypt. as is the first by a leader around since the country's revolution. >> the warm greetings signaled a fall in the formerly icy relations between the two nations, and yet, there are still plenty of bones of contention between the egyptian president and his iranian counterpart. for starters, the subject of syria. while iran supports the assad regime, morsi is one of the syrian president's sharpest critics. >> the syrian regime must look at the lessons from history. it is the people who remain. those who put their personal interests above the interests of their people will eventually be forced to leave. >> although morsi has called on all such a step down, he has called for a military intervention in syria. the final draft declaration calls for dialogue administration and represe
were. >>> the u.s. has spent billions to keep egypt on our side. shouldn't wed be buying better friends? the fallout could reshape the middle east and we've got details. >>> the plot thickens for baseball's latest steroid scandal. it is not alex rodriguez link to a miami steroids clinic. more baseball stars are forced to speak out. what is the cost to their endorsements in the league? a former world series champion will give us his take. even when they say it's not it is always about money. melissa: all right, first tonight, the bombshell hidden within the congressional budget office's new report. the first shocker, flies in the face of president obama's claim. >> no matter what you've heard, if you like your doctor or health care plan, you can keep it. melissa: well, not really. the cbo always expected some people would get bumped off their plans. now it projects that number is actually double the august estimate of 4 million people. now, looking more like 7 to 8 million americans will lose their benefits trat work. here to help us sort all this out,r. peter morici and dr. lee van noki
in egypt. protests took place across the country after hard line muslim clerics issued fat with as calling for secular and opposition leaders to be killed. protesters clashed outside the presidential pal as in cairo. dem stracors accused them of betraying and of favors islamists over secular combrists. french troops have been securing the town a day after they chased islamist fighters from one of their last remaining strongholds. the soldiers have been combing the town for militants and weaponry but malli is still far from secure. the president apologized on tv for an attack by disgruntled soldiers on paratroopers in which two lost their lives. a cashmiri man has been hanged. he was executed in an indian prison after his wife petitioned for mercy was rejected earlier this week. several rights groups say the former fruit march nt did not get a fair trial. he confessed in tv interviews to helping plan the attack that killed 14 people. he later denied any involvement and said he was tortured into confessing. for the first time in history, the long-term budget of the european union will be cut
urozone. london, midday here in 7:00 a.m. in washington, and 2:00 p.m. in the afternoon in egypt, where a balloon ride over luxor has ended in tragedy. a fire followed by an explosion and a 300 meter plunge to the ground. 19 tourists are dead, nine of them from hong kong. it is the latest blow to a tourist industry that has been suffering ever since the uprising two years ago. >> the balloon came down in fields west of luxor, a tourist event that ended in carnage. this mobile phones should it -- footage shows rescue teams the distance. one report says those who survived jump from the basket as it plummeted from the ground. eight photographer from another flight took these photos. he was just in front of the balloon that crash. >> while we were approaching the end of our balloon fried -- balloon flight heading into luxor, we heard a loud explosion. and then we saw a lot of smoke right behind us. our first giving was it could not be a balloon, but it turned out unfortunately to be this tragic accident. >> a balloon ride over some of egypt's most famous site are still a popular attraction.
in egypt has found life more difficult since the start of the arab spring two years ago. on the street affects what she does on the stage. nhk world has her story. ♪ >> reporter: the cairo ballet company was funded more than 45 years ago. they contain many dances from europe and even further away. three years ago, 24-year-old liza ocha became the first asian to hold a position of prima ballerina. she came to egypt six years ago, when she was just 18. she chose the company because of its strong reputation. >> people here are friendly. i feel comfortable. it's my sixth year. now i feel like this is the place where i belong. >> reporter: however, two years ago protests occurred in egypt. the upheavals have affected the ballerina dancers. >> translator: when there are demonstrations, it's dangerous to go outside. sometimes there are curfews. when that happens, all rehearsals are canceled. it can be hard to stay motivated with all that is going on. >> sometimes the principal male dancer misses rehearsals to join rallies in times square. he's worried about the growing islamic influence. >>
of the muslim brotherhood to mark the death of democracy in egypt. it depends how they behave. our policy, i agree with the ministration in this respect, has been to treat egypt and the elected government of egypt as the elected government of egypt. let me say something about democracy. we have to be clear about who is suffering from the sin of omniscience. you seem to know who is capable of democracy and who is not. we have been hearing about this for decades. tell it to the indians, what per capita income you have to have in order to be able to have a democracy. i have been hearing for decades that asians, for a variety of reasons, or not capable of democracy. catholic the countries, not capable of democracies. the last group of people not capable are living in the middle east. i am not prepared to make that judgment. i am prepared to give it a shot. if you had looked at germany as a result of its history going back 70 years, in 1945, you would not have said that germany was an obvious choice to be a democracy. yet, we were able to do something that was constructive. a lot of the things th
with that and developing news out of egypt tonight as well. richard, good evening. >> reporter: we are learning from turkish officials the bomber was a well known militant from a far left group and he served more than four years in a turkish prison, was involved in a hunger strike, and was eventually released from jail for medical reasons. he left the country and then returned from greece on a fake passport, but turkish officials don't know how long he's been in the country. they think he's been in ankara for the last ten days. this isn't the only situation u.s. officials are concerned about in the region. there is also egypt. u.s. officials are worried that ongoing clashes in egypt, including ones in front of the presidential palace, could be a signal that the egyptian government, led by president morsi of the muslim brotherhood is losing control of the streets of egypt, which would be a major problem for not only egypt but also the united states especially if the egyptian government were to collapse. >> richard engel in ankara tonight, thank you. >>> we turn to africa where the president of france
in cairo. it is the first time an iranian head of government has visited egypt since the iranian revolution in 1959. he got a grand reception but back home he has been dealt a big blow. one of his closest allies has been arrested. thought to be the latest in the approach between the president and his approach -- his opponent. more from cairo in a moment. >> the judiciary has not yet said what they have arrested him. one official report said that he was arrested for illegal possession of government property as the head of the social security network. ahmadinejad promoted him cheat -- two years after he was suspended as the prosecutor general. he is charged with the torture and death of protesters following the 2009 election. that prison has since been closed. back in 2003 he was in the custody of a canadian irani and. i will point out that he has never been charged for that. >> mahmoud ahmadinejad's visit to egypt is significant given that it is the first visit by an iranian head of state to egypt in more than 30 years. when president morsi visited in the summer, there was an agreement to re
egyptian president who once said the only two real nation states in the middle east are egypt and iran and the rest are just tribes with flights. it is significant -- with flags. it is significant that an iranian leader is visiting egypt for the first time in decades. and with the fall of hosni mubarak in egypt, the new government there has a somewhat different feel. they are looking more internal. their politics are much more in line with islamic politics of iran. and they are less beholden to u.s. policy. i do not think there will be an incredibly friendly relationship between egypt and iran. but what we are starting to see is some relationship between the two. >> but don't they have a very different idea about the civil war in syria? gregg's they absolutely do. they do not in line see eye to eye on many issues. in the west, we call it the arab spring. the iranian leadership call that an islamic awakening. they have a very civil philosophy, witches witches thad is -- which is that which is bad for the u.s. is good for the iran states. whether or not they're very friendly with iran is
in the role in here on egypt. we went to egypt, as you may know, and it was a very conflicted experience. i mean, who would not want to see the great pyramids of egypt? but in many ways, the problem with the situation in egypt, as we got to the pyramids and there was such a difficulty between the impoverishment of the modern time, but the grandeur of the dead time. and i began to see, as we went through the egyptian museum, and as we went to the pyramids, that on the basis of a single profound rite of passage - death - a most magnificent culture had emerged-ancient, archaic, egyptian culture. because what, in essence, was sparking that? it was maybe fear of death, but the desire for immortality, the desire for overcoming it. so with no further adieu, let's pick me up standing in front of the egyptian museum, and the piece on egypt. >> "don't go gently into that dark night - rage, rage, against the dying of the light." the brutality of brevity of human life has titillated the religious imagination of people down through history. i'm standing in front of the egypt museum here. we see that cer
and strife in egypt that you've been seeing during the second anniversary of the tahrir square uprising. are just the latest and most vivid illustration that egypt's revolution is going off the rails. it has revived talk about the failure of the arab spring and even some nostalgia for the old order. but let's remember, that old order was doomed. arab dictators like hosni mubarak could not have held on to power without even greater troubles. look at syria. # but events in the middle east the last two years do underscore something i have long believed that constitutions should take precedence over elections. let me explain. look at the difference between egypt and jordan. at the start of the arab spring, it appeared that egypt responded to the will of the people, made a clean break with its past and was ushering in a new birth of freedom. jordan, by contrast, had a number of protests, but king abdullah responded with only a few personnel changes and promised to study the situation and talk of reform. but then egypt started going down the wrong path and jordan made a set of wise choices. p
authorities to investigate what it's called a terrorist attack. meanwhile, violence escalated in egypt as thousands defy a curfew throwing molotov cocktails at the outer wall of the presidential compound. police have responded by firing water canons, rubber bullets, and tear gas at protesters. clashes this week have left dozens dead and prompted president morsi to declare a state of emergency in three cities along the suez canal. all of this in a nation that john kerry in his confirmation hearings declared crucial to our objectives in the region. joining us now from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman mohadine. >> i apologize, go ahead. >> you go ahead. tell us what's the latest from egypt? >> well, is just going to update us really quickly on the news we're getting about the rise in casualty figures. class slashes ha clashes have been taking place outside the presidential palace. there have been fatalities. the riot police have been firing tear gas to keep the protesters pushed further back. we also under the profetesters have been fired molotov cocktails. it is a very chaotic
a demonstrator fuels anger in egypt. syria's opposition tries to bring law and order to the streets of aleppo with a new police force. spain's prime minister denies receiving secret payments in a growing corruption scandal. and find out what drove a member of this japanese pop group to shave her head and apologize to her fans. welcome to the program. the french president francois hollande says his army will stay in mali until sovereignty is restored. he made the pledge on a triumphant trip to the country days after french troops ousted the rebels from the last of the three main northern cities they'd occupied. hollande got a hero's welcome visiting timbuktu. jackie is in timbuktu for us. not quite mission accomplished but it seems like hollande was welcomed, indeed. >> yes. francois hollande saw this as a mission of three stages to prevent the rebels from continuing their advance south, to recapture towns taken by the rebels and restore territorial integrity sovereignty to mali. the third part of the mission will take much longer. let's take a look at the president's day in tim puck to - timb
egypt for the first time since the 1970s, marking a thaw in relations between two of the middle east's heavyweights. egyptian president mohamed morsi quite literally laid out the red carpet for mahmoud ahmadinejad, greeting him with a kiss on each cheek. but when ahmadinejad visited a cairo mosque he was greeted with a very different arab tradition -- a shoe hurled at him by a protester. and the head of egypt's greatest islamic center warned him to stop meddling in arab countries. the iranian president has had a turbulent week not just in his travels but more importantly at home. why? try this comparison. we all know president obama and speaker john boehner are not best buddies. but imagine obama playing a video in the middle of congress, a video that claims to show boehner's brother soliciting a massive bribe. the iranian version of that is exactly what happened in tehran last sunday. in the middle of a packed house, mahmoud ahmadinejad played a secretly filmed video, one of many he claims to have collected. the man at the center of all this was sadegh larijani. his brother, ali, th
. >> i'm michael holmes. >> welcome to "around the world." egypt, a freak accident, hot air balloon explodes in the a plummets to the ground, 18 people dead. a live report. >>> vatican city, learning more about the future and what it holds for pope benedict xvi, final week cloud by scandal. >> the dow rallying from yesterday's big loss but not so for world markets. italy's election causing uncertainty. the government, europe's third largest economy, facing a deadlock. >>> egypt, tourists flying high above ancient egyptian sites plunging to their deaths when a hot air balloon explodes and crashes. >> 18 people have died. the local government has banned all other hot air balloon flights for now. it happened in luxor. the latest on the investigation. >> ian, let's start with what the theory is at the moment. there are reports of a gas cylinder exploding. describe what you've heard. >> reporter: well, michael, that's exactly what ware we're hearing. an the 1,000 feet a gas canister on the balloon exploded sending the balloon tumbling towards the ground. this comes from multiple reported
leaders are watching the relationship between iran and egypt tonight. iran's president, ahmadinejad is in cairo for an islamic summit. it is the first time an eye rain wran leader has visited egypt in more than 30 years. we have more now on the historic trip and developing relationship between two controversial leaders. >> reporter: iran's president ahmadinejad made a historic visit to cairo, becoming irania to visit egypt. he arrived and met by mohammed morsey. it the first time an iranian leader visited egypt since 1979. the year that egypt signed a peace treaty with israel and iran overthrew the shah. since then the two regional heavyweights have been at birth odds over policy and all kinds of issues across the region. but since becoming the first democratically elected president in egypt back in july, mohammed morsey visited iran while a few months after that, iran is now returning the favor and also rumored that the two countries will be holding bilateral meetings and at the highest levels of government to discuss reege malissues. despite what many are concerned about being a w
's desperately trying to hold on. how he got there right after this. reports that egypt, our old friend egift is blocking american investigators from talking to the terror ring leader connected to the murder of four americans in benghazi. the same egypt that we're going to give a billion and a half dollars in u.s. foreign aid to this year. and ambassador john bolton at the top of the hour. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack and make no mistake, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attacked our people. >> back now to the major developments in the oscar pistorius bail hearing and the murder charges against him. it's facing now serious challenges making it appear more and more likely the man they called the blade runner could get out on bond as he awaits trial in connection with the shooting death of his girlfriend which has been charged as pre-meditated murder. get out on bond? they didn't think it was possible 48 hours ago. among the latest twists the lead investigator has been moved from the case. an
>>> welcome to "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. from mali to egypt to syria, unrest across north africa and the middle east is growing. one leading expert tells how washington should respond to promote stability and protect its interests. but first, the tense line between personal privacy and national security has been an issue since 9/11. few agencies are more secretive or more involved in sensitive global intelligence collection and analysis than the national security agency. which must deal with this delicate issue on a daily basis. nsa technical experts must keep the nation safe complying with all rules and regulations. the man heading up the effort to quote keep the spies in line as some say is john delong. nsa's first ever compliance director. john welcome to the program. >> thanks for having me on the show. >> so let's starlet out. i mean -- start out. i mean the stereotype is that the national security agency can spy on anybody it wants to spy on and can do anything that it wants but you guys are really in a delicate spot as an intelligence agency who has to
? >> certainly not. the whole region is in turmoil, weather we look at nigeria, mali, egypt -- whether we look at nigeria, mali, egypt. this was really meant as a warning shot against syria, but then again, the region isyou doe react. i think this is also a message by israel to iran indicating that israel is not willing to accept any deals. >> is that why israel has attacked? >> there is no knowledge of why exactly israel attacked last night rather than a week ago or a week later. i think the new government in the making wants to make clear that they will continue policies towards the region, and it is a clear message towards iran and also towards russia. >> what about the united nations' clear criticism of israel's settlement activity? >> israel will continue to ignore this decision. so will the united states. they will continue to back israeli policies in the occupied territories, but nevertheless, there is a certain change of attitudes to be observed in western countries. more and more criticism coming along with israeli settlement policies, and i think israelis feel the heat. you might eve
appears to be far from over. >> coming up, the latest round of protests in egypt, this time in favor of president morsi. >> but first, we will look at some other stories making news. venezuelan state television has released photos of hugo chavez, who is recovering from cancer treatment in cuba. these are the first images of the ailing president to be released in months. venezuela reelected him last year, but he has not yet been well enough. >> the german finance minister fills a post which has been vacant since the previous chief was fired for incompetence nine months ago. >> airport security workers have suspended a strike in two major german airports for the weekend. the strike's over higher pay have forced the cancellation of hundreds of flights. workers say they will resume the strike starting next week. >> in the gulf kingdom of bahrain, protesters have clashed with police for a second day. shiite muslims are in the majority, but the country is ruled by a sunni royal family and elite. a policeman and a teenage protester died in the clashes. >> over in egypt, thousands of hard-li
polarization. there is fears that a teenager will be similar to egypt in terms of increasing street violence. two nations are proud. they have a liberal and secular outlook and will not be like egypt. one analyst pointed out that this is -- there are two different views. that is what is planning out in a tunisian and egypt. this is not chaos. this is a classic in high-stakes political struggle. >> which one will triumph in the end? >> the key theoretically would be elections. you'd have a clear victor. there were elections in tunisia. the islamist did very well. they never had power before but many people have been disappointed with the government and the way the world. another round of elections, secularists hope they might win. but again, when there is this kind of discontent, this kind of paralysis in the government an election scheduled is a dangerous situation and i feel both sides have missed a historic government. -- opportunity. it is a dangerous game of brinksmanship now. >> it seemed like a beacon of, for the middle east when the revolution began. what does this mean for everyone e
. >>> egypt's economic landscape has been clouded with political instability, but the chairman of citadel capital says the muslim brotherhood is clearly pro market. he told cnbc in an exclusive interview on access middle east that the country's leadership needs time to find its way, that he's confident on political stability going forward. usef has more from dubai. some interesting comments here. >> absolutely, kelly. aman who i spoke to who heads citadel capital, they manage monies in places like southern sudan, kenya, and he's bullish about not just egypt in the long term, but also about africa. he's like, listen, if you are trying to sun risk, just go by with t-bonds. he's very positive about the continent. it's not the demographic. it's not the natural resources. what he's really excited about is improved governance. you look at egypt which continues to be in political disarray despite an elected government and you ask yourself, is this really the case? how much of a long-term horizon do we need to have at this point? here are his thoughts on the income of governments and the muslim b
of the kings in egypt killed 19 people. a look at the world's largest train network as india announces a big investment to improve its railways. ♪ >> how greater thanrapper from taiwan called dog g is trying to stop the government from putting down straight pets. the parliamentary election that was supposed to bring political and economic stability to italy has been quite the opposite. preliminary results show there is no clear winner. equally unclear is how bitter rivals will be able to come together to lead the country. former prime minister silvio berlusconi made a sort of a comeback at may secure the upper house. according to his latest results, his main rival has managed to win a majority in the lower house. and beppe grillo, a comedian turned politician, appears to be riding a wave of protest votes. what happens next? the only solution appears to be some sort of coalition. the outgoing prime minister, his coalition trailed for the and the vote, said the common ground must be found. >> it is too early to consider any solution, nor does arrest upon me to find one. but right now i cons
to our viewers on public television in america, and elsewhere around the globe. viewing injuns egypt -- viewing egypt's henchen sites from hot air balloon has long been a tourist attraction, but to date a tragedy. 19 people on board were killed near luxor. >> these are the final moments of a flight along the nile, captured by a passenger on another balloon, watching on in horror. than 20 were on board when it caught fire. the heat only driving the balloon higher into the sky. before it plummets to the ground. mohamed yousef had been the pilot of a different balloon and saw how the tragedy began. >> i saw a lot of fire. and i saw the pilot. then he jumped. he was on fire on his arms. the customer's job. >> ambulances were quickly at the scene. most of the passengers had already died. survived, but was badly injured. questions are being asked about whether his company could have done more to prevent the accident. >> this balloon three days ago, it was flying. not shiping, it did well. >> three tourists from the u.k. were among those shipped to the hospital. there was one other passenge
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 849 (some duplicates have been removed)